Foreign Aid

The Haitian Migration

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
January 9, 2012 |

As we approach the second anniversary of the devastating Haiti earthquake, which killed around 150,000 people and destroyed much of Port-au-Prince, there has been mixed progress.  About half of the rubble has been cleared (if that sounds slow, consider it took five years to remove far less rubble in Aceh after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami). About half a million people are still living in camps in Haiti -- but that is down from closer to 1.5 million two years ago. Meanwhile cholera, introduced by U.N.

From your pocket to theirs: a new approach to charity

January 12, 2012
http://www.flickr.com/photos/futurowoman/4842606100/

The Global Assets Project has written extensively about the virtues of international aid agencies and national governments transferring money directly to poor households. As such, we are thrilled to see a US-based NGO, GiveDirectly, taking this idea "to the streets" and enabling people to directly donate money to poor households in Kenya via their mobile phones. Similar to other cash-transfer programs, GiveDirectly’s model is incredibly efficient, with around 90 cents of every dollar ending up in the hands of beneficiaries, and enables recipients to decide for themselves how to go about meeting their needs.

Despite Everything, There's Plenty to Celebrate in 2012

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
December 31, 2011 |

It seems a hard time to be confident about the state of the country – or the state of the planet. We are still facing the aftershocks of the worst recession since the great depression and a significant risk of dipping back into it. Europe's economy looks increasingly old and enfeebled compared with the virile young tigers of Asia. Terrorism strikes fear at home while war drags on in Afghanistan and violence is used against protesters in Syria and elsewhere. And the condition of the global environment appears fragile at best.

Israeli-Palestinian Talks in Jordan: Working Hard at Treading Water

  • By
  • Daniel Levy,
  • Leila Hilal,
  • New America Foundation
January 5, 2012 |

On January 6, 2011, then Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to Sharm el Sheikh in an effort to resuscitate the flagging peace process. Egypt for many years played the role of regional protector of an Israeli-Palestinian peace process, which was extremely heavy on process while being ever-more transparently light on delivering peace. It is a role that the new Egypt is unlikely to volunteer for.

Iraq Is a Mess. But Leaving Was the Right Call

  • By
  • Douglas Ollivant,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2011 |

Let us stipulate some ugly facts up front. Iraq remains a weak state. The political institutions are—charitably—immature. The business climate is not overly attractive and corruption is endemic. Were it not for oil, there would be no real economy. There is a serious terrorism problem. Relationships with all the neighboring states are problematic. Sectarian divides remain tense, with some key fault lines unresolved. The country’s armed forces remain incapable of defending its international borders.

The Last Straw for Bedouin in Jerusalem's Periphery?

  • By
  • Jonathan Guyer,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2011 |

United Nations officials have issued a warning that the Government of Israel's plans for Palestinian Bedouin communities living in Jerusalem's periphery could constitute "mass forcible transfers" and "grave breaches" of international law. A pending plan in the West Bank threatens to displace Khan al-Ahmar, a Bedouin village of refugees originally from Israel's south, pushed off their indigenous land in the early 1950's. Khan al-Ahmar lies on the side of a major West Bank thoroughfare and is sandwiched between the Israeli settlement of Maale Adumin and Jerusalem.

Stop Fretting About Beijing as a Global Policeman

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Jonas Parello-Plesner, European Council on Foreign Relations
December 28, 2011 |

This year proved a tipping point for China’s approach to the world. The confluence of Europe’s debt crisis and America’s contracting defence budget has created rising expectations that China will shoulder ever greater power burdens for international stability. No longer can it keep a low profile in international strategic and economic affairs. Could it join America as a world policeman sooner than expected?

Christmas in Havana: President Obama Prevails on Cuban Family Travel Rules

  • By
  • Anya Landau French,
  • New America Foundation
December 16, 2011 |

Whenever someone asked me why we have the same anachronistic policy toward an island nation 90 ninety from our shores that we have had for half a century, I generally tell them that Cuba simply "doesn't matter." In a big-picture sense, our policy hasn't changed (or has only gotten hotter) since the Cold War ended and left two combatants behind on the field.

Change Afghanistan Can Believe In

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
December 12, 2011 |

After 10 years of war and reconstruction, and as tens of thousands of international troops and aid workers in Afghanistan gear up to spend yet another holiday season a long way from the comforts of home, a lot of people are wondering: Was it worth it? Certainly Dec.

Did We Win the Iraq War?

  • By
  • Fred Kaplan,
  • New America Foundation
December 16, 2011 |

As the last American troops leave Iraq (a remarkable phrase, which many once doubted would ever be uttered), two questions come to mind: Was the war worth it? And did we, in any sense, win?

The two questions, of course, are related: The first concerns cost, the second benefits. But however you do the calculation, it's clear that the decision to invade Iraq was a major strategic blunder—and that the policies we pursued in the early months of the occupation tipped the blunder into a catastrophe.

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