Public Media

Call for Paper Proposals

July 2, 2013

Call for Paper Proposals

The Role of Advocacy in Media and Telecom Policy

A by-invitation experts’ workshop
New America Foundation
Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, 2013

Open Data Movement

  • By
  • Alissa Black,
  • New America Foundation
July 2, 2012 |

The open data movement is taking root at the local level. Since President Barack Obama’s 2009 memorandum on transparency and open government, datacatalogs.org has reported that more than 40 state, county, and local governments in the United States have put data catalogues online. Open data policies typically define open data as structured standardized data in machine readable formats published for the public. This means that government data can be downloaded in such formats as CSV, KML, XML, and even XLS. Sharing information is not new.

Building a Multi-Platform Media For—and By—the Public

  • By
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • Benjamin Lennett,
  • New America Foundation

At first glance, the new rule approved last month by the Federal Communications Commission requiring local television broadcasters to make public their records on political ad spending might seem revelatory. But in reality, it represents a very modest change to longstanding policy.

Finding journalism's Future

  • By
  • Victor Pickard,
  • New America Foundation
April 11, 2012 |

This newspaper's parent company sold last week for $55 million, a staggering $460 million less than what it fetched in 2006. The plight of the company, which also owns the Daily News and Philly.com, reflects trends afflicting newspapers across the country, which continue to bleed revenue and jobs as readers and advertisers migrate to the Internet. It seems that advertising-fueled newspapers, nearly the last institutional bastion of journalism, are not sustainable.

The Internet’s Intolerable Acts

  • By
  • Sascha Meinrath,
  • James Losey,
  • New America Foundation
December 8, 2011 |

The United States of America was forged in resistance to collective reprisals—the punishment of many for the acts of few. In 1774, following the Boston Tea Party, the British Parliament passed a series of laws—including the mandated closure of the port of Boston—meant to penalize the people of Massachusetts. These abuses of power, labeled the "Intolerable Acts," catalyzed the American Revolution by making plain the oppression of the British crown.

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com and cross posted from the Open Technology Initiative.

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

In Defense of the Internet Craftsman

  • By
  • James Losey,
  • Sascha Meinrath,
  • New America Foundation
August 15, 2011 |

In 1439, Johannes Gutenberg sparked an information revolution. The invention of movable type lowered barriers for sharing ideas, creating spaces for reformation and revolution. Today's Internet fulfills the same role, a flexible medium for sharing information and democratic communications. It was with this idealized Web in mind that President Obama used his 2011 State of the Union address to call for an expansion of next-generation mobile broadband.

Repressing the Internet, Western-Style

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
August 13, 2011 |

Did the youthful rioters who roamed the streets of London, Manchester and other British cities expect to see their photos scrutinized by angry Internet users, keen to identify the miscreants? In the immediate aftermath of the riots, many cyber-vigilantes turned to Facebook, Flickr and other social networking sites to study pictures of the violence. Some computer-savvy members even volunteered to automate the process by using software to compare rioters' faces with faces pictured elsewhere on the Internet.

Media Is Growing More White. What’s the FCC Doing About It?

  • By
  • Jason Smith,
  • New America Foundation
August 11, 2011 |

The increasing lack of racial diversity in the U.S. media landscape is becoming a hot topic and putting pressure on policy makers to (finally) pay attention.

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