Information Ecology

Call for Paper Proposals

July 2, 2013

Call for Paper Proposals

The Role of Advocacy in Media and Telecom Policy

A by-invitation experts’ workshop
New America Foundation
Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, 2013

The Sidebar: Internet Policy & National Security Rhetoric

April 20, 2012
The short fallings of US internet policy and national security rhetoric in a world where information and technological developments are more easily collected and shared around the world are topics for this week’s episode of The Sidebar.  Host Pamela Chan is joined by Thomas Gideon from the Open Technology Initiative and Konstantin Kakaes from the Schwartz Fellows Program. 

The Sidebar: The U.S. Budget and Community WiFi

April 6, 2012
The U.S. Budget and Community WiFi are topics for discussion this week, as host Pamela Chan is joined by Preston Rhea and Jason Peuquet.
Programs:

The Sidebar: Race Relations and the Evolution of Media

March 30, 2012
Tom Glaisyer and Reniqua Allen discuss the difficulty of talking about race in America and the evolution of media. Pamela Chan Hosts.

Misinformation and Fact-checking

  • By Brendan Nyhan, Asst. Professor, Dartmouth College; Jason Reifler, Asst. Professor, Georgia State
February 28, 2012

Citizens and journalists are concerned about the prevalence of misinformation in contemporary politics, which may pollute democratic discourse and undermine citizens’ ability to cast informed votes and participate meaningfully in public debate. Academic research in this area paints a pessimistic picture—the most salient misperceptions are widely held, easily spread, and difficult to correct. Corrections can fail due to factors including motivated reasoning, limitations of memory and cognition, and identity factors such as race and ethnicity.

The Fact-Checking Universe in Spring 2012

  • By
  • Lucas Graves,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • New America Foundation
February 28, 2012

By almost any measure, the 2012 presidential race is shaping up to be the most fact-checked electoral contest in American history. Every new debate and campaign ad yields a blizzard of fact-checking from the new full-time fact-checkers, from traditional news outlets in print and broadcast, and from partisan political organizations of various stripes. And though fact-checking still peaks before elections it is now a year-round enterprise that challenges political claims beyond the campaign trail.

The Other Academic Freedom Movement

  • By
  • Konstantin Kakaes,
  • New America Foundation
February 9, 2012 |

In the summer of 1991, Paul Ginsparg, a researcher at the Los Alamos nuclear laboratory, set up an email system for about 200 string theorists to exchange papers they had written. The World Wide Web was a mere infant—it had been opened to the public on Aug. 6 of that year. The string theorists weren’t particularly interested in making their research widely available (outsiders would have a tough time following the conversation anyhow). Ginsparg’s archive was a way for the theorists to communicate with one another.

The Difference Between Online Knowledge and Truly Open Knowledge

  • By
  • C. W. Anderson,
  • New America Foundation
February 3, 2012 |

In "Too Big To Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now that the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room", the simultaneously fascinating and frustrating book by Berkman Center senior researcher David Weinberger, there is a wonderful moment where the mechanisms of "fact-building" are laid bare.

"It's 1983. You want to know the population of Pittsburgh, so instead of waiting six years for the web to be invented, you head to the library," Weinberger begins.

The Internet’s Intolerable Acts

  • By
  • Sascha Meinrath,
  • James Losey,
  • New America Foundation
December 8, 2011 |

The United States of America was forged in resistance to collective reprisals—the punishment of many for the acts of few. In 1774, following the Boston Tea Party, the British Parliament passed a series of laws—including the mandated closure of the port of Boston—meant to penalize the people of Massachusetts. These abuses of power, labeled the "Intolerable Acts," catalyzed the American Revolution by making plain the oppression of the British crown.

Occupy the Net!

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
November 17, 2011 |

What would George Orwell make of Facebook? Nothing really: His account would probably be deactivated by the company. If he were lucky, he would be told to produce a scanned first page of his passport and return as Eric Blair.

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